Do You Do It Until You’re Satisfied Or Just For The Money?

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Recently, I was reading an article about a successful songwriter who is about to step into the spotlight as a solo artist. She has paid her dues, working as a backup singer and as a songwriter for others for years. It’s been her dream to be a singer since she was a child. When asked to proffer advice to upcoming artists, she said: “You shouldn’t be doing this to be famous or to live the fabulous life. Come to the table with a love to the music, a passion inside.” (Charlie Vox)


Her quote struck me because I found it fascinating that she would advise people to do music because they loved it, not to make money. Most successful music artists project images of living large, and of beautiful lives where they rake in millions of dollars. So it makes you wonder if they are doing it for the money, or if they love what they do.

Can the two go hand in hand?

For example, R&B singer Chris Brown has a net worth of $24 million, according to However, recently he announced he was quitting the music biz. So being a multi-millionaire at 24 is not enough? Is it not fun anymore to sing and dance in front of crowds of screaming girls?

Certainly, there are parallels in many other lines of business as well. Some people may spend eight years beyond high school studying to be a doctor because they want to help people, while others do it because doctors tend to make a lot of money. Others have gotten into the business of turning over houses, for example, because of hopes of a big financial return, and because they find great satisfaction from turning a dump into another man’s castle.

What really drives our career choices? I’d like to think that the answer comes from a balance of both worlds that the reward comes from our need and desire to be financially secure, as well as our need to do what makes us happy. That’s the ideal situation… to find a balance between fundamental rewards (a desire from within) and factors from outside, such as money.

Did you choose your career because of the money or because you love what you do?

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